Dog Accompanies Mom To Hospital Where She Works And Serves As A Therapy Dog For Health Workers

While waiting to be old enough to train and become an assistance dog, Wynn is being cared for by Susan Ryan who also trains the pup.
Susan works in a hospital and when the coronavirus broke out in the country, she and the other health workers have become insanely busy.
Good thing, Wynn is there to comfort them and serve as their therapy dog in this very stressful time.Wynn aspires to become a service dog that assists people with disabilities. But she is only a year old and still too young.

But soon, she’ll be old enough to be trained under Canine Companions for Independence. For now, her keeper Susan Ryan, is the one socializing and training her.Since the day Susan met Wynn, she knew she was special. She was adorable, sweet and playful, and she could always tackle every challenge she faced.“I have two of my own Labs at home and she always does surprise attacks on them,” Susan told The Dodo. “Once her vest is on, though, she is all business.”

Susan works at Rose Medical Center in Denver, Colorado, as an emergency physician, and she thought that taking Wynn to the hospital would help in her socializing and training. Wynn has always loved going to the hospital, but when the coronavirus broke out in the country, Wynn realized she’s bound to do more than just the usual leisure visit.

As the pandemic persists, the hospital has become crazily busy. The doctors, nurses, and other health workers are working hard to provide patients the best care they deserve. But they get tired and stressed too, and that’s what Wynn is there for—to comfort them as a therapy dog would. When they find a time to decompress, Wynn is present to keep them company.

Susan has become busy too and though Wynn goes home with her, she still takes time during breaks to let the dog comfort her. They would sit on the floor and Wynn would sweetly lean on Susan as if thanking her for her hard work and dedication.

“She comforts us for sure,” Susan said.

Eventually, the time will come for Wynn to move on as she becomes an assistance dog, but for now, her presence in the hospital is a great help for all the staff who need her comfort.

“When I walk into a shift the staff light up,” Susan said. “But it’s for Wynn, not me.”